A Distinction Without a Difference: Death with Dignity and Suicide

Kate Bresee On November 1st, 2014, Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with terminal brain cancer, ended her life under the sanction of Oregon’s Death with Dignity (DWD) Act. The general notion of the individual’s “right to die” that was reflected in Maynard’s decision has been a growing controversy in recent years as …

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Lost and Found: Wandering in the Biblical Narrative

Alyssa Mallgrave A couple of years ago, my family traveled to Ireland. Throughout the trip, the members of my party kept marveling at the country’s beauty, history, and seemingly simple lifestyle. They envisioned a life there. On the last day of our trip, I found myself on a horse, being escorted around a stable by a …

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William Wordsworth’s Development of the Idea of the Self

Hope Stebbins “The mind of man is framed even like the breath And harmony of music. There is a dark Invisible workmanship that reconciles Discordant elements, and makes them move In one society.”[1] Romanticism as a literary period began as a reaction against empiricism and the loftiness of reason during the Enlightenment. William Wordsworth, along with other …

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God: Sufficiently Rational, or Infinitely Good?

Monica Jekel Leibniz’s notion of sufficient reason and his use of univocal language, applied to God’s nature and acts, results in a truncated view of God’s infinite goodness, excluding a robust, Christian understanding of God’s transcendence and instead purporting a mechanized account of exalted Deism. The principle of sufficient reason is a rationalist principle that contrasts with …

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‘Si Finisti, Deus Non Est’

Austin Detwiler In a moment of particularly creative philosophy, Martin Heidegger suggested a new etymology of alētheia.[1] Truth, he argued, is not to be sought in some correspondence between propositions and the ‘objective’ world, but in the process of ‘dis-covering,’ pulling back the shroud that hides Being, and revealing that which was previously in the dark. Heidegger’s …

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To Meet One’s Match: Mutuality and Jest in The Taming of the Shrew

Abigail Storch Upon cursory reading, The Taming of the Shrew appears dramatically deviant when located within the larger canon of Shakespearean comedy. In a canonical world populated by women such as Rosalind, Portia, and Viola—independent women of wit and wisdom who craft their own futures and take fate into their own hands—the content of The Taming …

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A Great Chain of Lights Let Down from Heaven: Dionysius’ Apophatic Theology

Jacob Nielsen Dionysius the Areopagite, the pseudonymous author of the Corpus Areopagiticum, is a figure shrouded in mystery. Although the author of the Dionysian corpus identifies himself as Paul’s convert mentioned in Acts 17, modern scholarship is unanimous in its judgment that Dionysius (or “Pseudo-Dionysius” according to scholarly convention) lived and wrote sometime during the late …

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In Search of the Philosophical Origins of “Oxrev Feminism”

Ryan Klein Several few months ago, a public debate which was to be hosted by Oxford Students For Life at Christ’s Church College concerning the societal impact of abortion was cancelled due to threat of mob action. In anticipation of that debate the Oxford Students’ Union group Oxrev Fem had created a Facebook page titled “What the F*ck is …

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Scientific Wonder: Religion and Science in Conversation

Benjamin Barnhart On February 4, 2014, a debate was broadcast over YouTube, between Bill Nye, of the popular show Bill Nye the Science Guy, and Ken Ham of Answers in Genesis, a young earth creationist organization. The topic of discussion was none other than the age of the universe. Ken Ham, armed with passages from the …

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A Critical Essay on Michael Ward’s Planet Narnia

Lauren Bujaky In his critical essay, “On Stories,” C.S. Lewis remarks upon the notion that books are specimens of escapism, “In the same way the whole story, paradoxically enough, strengthens our relish for real life. This excursion into the preposterous sends us back with renewed pleasure to the actual.”[1] To this effect, Michael Ward proposes in …

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