Freedom to Pursue the Common Good

Individual freedom is not only compatible with, but necessary for the state’s pursuit of the common good. This statement, however, cannot go without qualification because unlimited individual freedom equates to lawlessness. A lawless state is chaotic, and will inevitably be torn apart by the conflicting desires of its citizens. Eventually, it would cease to be …

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Natural Law and the Why of Christian Ethics

Christians in America, now more than ever, find themselves in the unfamiliar position of having to reason in the public square with fellow citizens and leaders who are not convinced of the Bible’s ultimate authority. Though unfamiliar to us, this would have been nothing new for the early Church. The apostle Paul faced a similar …

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On Feminism and the Presbyterian Church in America

Prolegomena ‘Feminism,’ in the conservative PCA tradition, is often equated to a humanistic revenge against a historically misogynistic patriarchy. The term is frequently used in PCA circles as a dysphemism, calling to mind the noble battle the Church – sound theology, tradition, and doctrine – faces against secular philosophy. Both sides perceive the issue as …

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The Value of Euclid’s Elements

When surveying the history of mathematics, the impact of Euclid of Alexandria can hardly be overstated. His magnum opus, Elements, is the second most frequently sold book in the history of the world. For over 2,000 years, his work was considered the definitive textbook not only for geometry, but also for the entirety of mathematics. …

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Can Christians Be Effective Historians?

In his essay, Claims of Theory, historian Geoffrey Elton writes, All forms of religious belief threaten the historian’s ability to think for himself and to investigate the reality of the past. The historian, it seems, if he values his integrity, must be a professional skeptic.[1] According to Elton, religious beliefs demand that history fit into …

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Justice: Revealing Humanity through Love of Neighbor

Despite the common distinction between the two words, justice is fundamentally love for our neighbor—and therefore is central to our humanity. Simone Weil gives us this definition of justice in her essay The Love of Our Neighbor, explaining that Christ called his benefactors, those who took him in when he was starving and naked, just. …

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How the American War Altered the British Concept of The Empire

Historians often focus on United States in the wake of the American Revolutionary War. However, the effects of this war rippled beyond North America throughout the British Empire and the world. The British reaction to the loss of the American colonies sheds light on the reasons that imperialism began to shift in the nineteenth century. …

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