Debunking Double Effect

Thomas Coyle There is a temptation to think that the principle of double effect rules out the need for an “ends-justify-the-means” approach in ethics, and to think that double effect is always capable of adequately distinguishing between ethical and unethical practices. In this paper I argue that the principle of double effect cannot replace an …

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The Christian Artist Responds to Nietzsche: Art that Says ‘Yes’ to this Life and the Life to Come

Philosophers have debated the purpose of art for centuries. It is less common for a philosopher to present a fully articulated vision for art. Nietszche and E. John Walford present a vision for art, which is strikingly similar. Though informed by vastly different philosophies (one Christian, the other not), they detect similar dangers of particular artistic impulses. This essay works out the details of their shared visions and worries regarding art as well as explores the distinctions of the alternative models that they present. The main distinction being that one is ultimately tragic and the other is not.

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The Lay Investiture Contest

Tim Austen The final centuries of the first millennium AD are remembered as the Dark Ages, robbed of light and safety by fearsome invasions that radically transformed the world of classical antiquity so that it no longer recognized itself. The various European kingdoms that were left to themselves in the wake of the sack of Rome …

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The One, the Many-As-One: Concerning Monks, Society, and the Meaning of Life

Daniel LaVenture Almost every civilization in history has had its ascetics – those dissenters of society who protest social norms by invoking self-denying behavior that challenges conventional understandings of the good and proper life. The pervasiveness of asceticism seems to suggest that there is something inherently deceptive about society itself that lures us into false understandings …

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