The Value of Euclid’s Elements

When surveying the history of mathematics, the impact of Euclid of Alexandria can hardly be overstated. His magnum opus, Elements, is the second most frequently sold book in the history of the world. For over 2,000 years, his work was considered the definitive textbook not only for geometry, but also for the entirety of mathematics. …

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Can Christians be Effective Historians?

In his essay, Claims of Theory, historian Geoffrey Elton writes, All forms of religious belief threaten the historian’s ability to think for himself and to investigate the reality of the past. The historian, it seems, if he values his integrity, must be a professional skeptic.[1] According to Elton, religious beliefs demand that history fit into …

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Freedom to Pursue the Common Good

Individual freedom is not only compatible with, but necessary for the state’s pursuit of the common good. This statement, however, cannot go without qualification because unlimited individual freedom equates to lawlessness. A lawless state is chaotic, and will inevitably be torn apart by the conflicting desires of its citizens. Eventually, it would cease to be …

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